Despite Event Cancellation, Auction Napa Valley Will Continue to Donate to Nonprofits

Last year’s 39th annual Auction Napa Valley, a four-day celebration of wine and vintners, raised nearly $12 million dollars for 25 local nonprofits and featured entertainment from Katy Perry, food from Ayesha Curry’s International Smoke and the world’s only single-case auction of 100 or more lots.

Katy Perry at Last Year's Auction Napa Valley
Katy Perry at the 2019 Auction Napa Valley / Alexander Rubin for Napa Valley Vintners

But the event’s 40th year is not going to be the same kind of affair. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, last month Napa Valley Vintners announced it is canceling the event.

“We are deeply grateful for the tremendous support we have had for 40 years in creating the auction, from our vintners, bidders, volunteers, community, partners and businesses,” says Linda Reiff, president and CEO of the NVV. “The most important priority right now is for everyone to care for their families, employees and communities.”

Over the past 40 years, Napa Valley Vintners has donated $200 million to community health and children’s education and they aren’t planning on letting this year’s cancelation halt that ongoing effort. Last month’s announcement included a pledge to still make donations at least equal to last year’s, to help address community needs arising from the pandemic and shelter-in-place orders. The money comes from a reserve fund.

2019 Auction Napa Valley
2019 Auction Napa Valley / Alexander Rubin for Napa Valley Vintners.

Bart and Daphne Araujo, founders of world-famous Araujo Estate Wines (sold in 2013) and Wheeler Farms, will remain as chairs of the 2021 Auction Napa Valley, which will take place June 3–6.

“It is an honor to be asked to remain as chairs for Auction Napa Valley 2021 and it will be a great pleasure to get back to work and welcome everyone to Napa next year,” the couple said.

How You Can Help

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Daniel Jewett has been a Bay Area journalist for more than two decades, getting his start as editor of his hometown newspaper, the Foster City Progress. Jewett went on to serve as Associate Editor for Oakland and Alameda magazines before crossing the bridge to serve as Marin Magazine and Spaces’ Managing Editor. Jewett still calls Oakland home, where he writes and plays music with his wife in My Little Hum and hangs out with his chickens, bees and cats, Holly and Maple.