Conservation Research Conducted 26.9 Miles From Marin

Did You Know: There are 13 species of seabirds that breed on the Farallon Islands, numbering more than 350,000 individuals during the peak of the season. In addition, there have been over 400 other bird species observed on the island over the course of the last 50 year some are common migrants that you might see in your backyard.

While others are vagrants that have wandered off course from as far away as Siberia or South America and have only been seen a few times. Data and research findings from the Farallones have directly contributed to several important conservation measures. Point Blue Conservation Science has been conducting research since 1965 and their findings have been particularly important for effectively managing human uses such as shipping and offshore energy development so that they can benefit us while causing the least impact on wildlife.


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Mimi Towle Author BioMimi Towle has been the editor of Marin Magazine for over a decade and is currently the national editorial director of Make it Better Media. She lived with her family in Sycamore Park and Strawberry and thoroughly enjoyed raising two daughters in the mayhem of Marin’s youth sports; soccerswimvolleyballballethip hopgymnastics and many many hours spent at Miwok Stables. Her community involvements include volunteering at her daughter’s schools, coaching soccer and volleyball (glorified snack mom), being on the board of both Richardson Bay Audubon Center and then The EACH Foundation. Currently residing on a floating home in Sausalito, she enjoys all water activity, including learning how to steer a 6-person canoe for the Tamalpais Outrigger Canoe Club. Born and raised in Hawaii, her fondness for the islands has on occasion made its way into the pages of the magazine. If you want more, she’s created a website, HawaiiIslander.com.