These 7 Must-Have Fall Jackets Are Eco-Friendly AND Chic

Unfortunately, the time has come. Fall is here and like it or not, it’s time for jacket weather. If your go-to jacket is looking a little tired, don’t worry: we’ve rounded up seven of the best sustainable coats for you to slip on all season long, and maybe even into the winter months. 

Patagonia Women’s Houdini Jacket in Light Balsamic, $99

Fall Jackets: Patagonia Women’s Houdini Jacket in Light Balsamic

Autumn in Illinois means rain. And if not rain, then mist. This rain coat, made from 100 percent recycled nylon, is exactly what the doctor ordered, and in a chic burgundy color, it won’t make you feel too dorky. Two bonuses: one of the pockets turns into a stuff sack, which means you can squish it into a tiny pillow for travel purposes, and it was sewn under fair-trade certified circumstances.

Filippa K Alexa Coat in Blue Grey, $1,100

Fall Jackets: Filippa K Alexa Coat in Blue Grey

This gorgeous blue coat from Swedish designer Filippa K is definitely a splurge, but it’s also a coat that will A) last you a lifetime and B) never go out of style. Reader, I actually gasped when I saw this coat — that’s how beautiful it is. The sky-blue color, the high neck, the elegant shape, the belt … I MEAN. The coat is made from a combination of mulesing-free wool from a Responsible Wool Standard certified factory and cashmere (can you say luxe?) and was made in a safe factory with transparent business practices. So go ahead — splurge.

Amour Vert Mayson Bomber Jacket in Black, $218

Fall Jackets: Amour Vert Mayson Bomber Jacket in Black

A good bomber jacket is a fall closet staple — it instantly glams up any outfit with jeans or tones down a slinky dress. This offering was handmade in the USA using Mulberry silk from family-owned operations and dyed with nontoxic dyes. Amour Vert makes its clothes in limited quantities to avoid textile waste and ensure high production standards.

Nau Sequenshell Waterproof Trench Coat in Green, $285

Fall Jackets: Nau Sequenshell Waterproof Trench Coat in Green

For those days when a short raincoat just won’t cut it, enter: the waterproof trench coat. And it has a hood! The sleek shape and vibrant color are just icing on the cake, though — the coat is made from 100 percent recycled polyester. As a company, Nau is ahead of the curve, using just 10 sustainable textiles for all of their jackets and donating 2 percent of every dollar you spend on the site to grassroots environmentalist causes.

Reformation Woodside Jacket in Light Blue Check, $228

Fall Jackets: Reformation Woodside Jacket in Light Blue Check

This coat is an elevated version of your favorite oversized flannel. It’s cozy, warm, and makes an outfit look effortlessly put together. Reformation has been leading the charge toward ethical fashion for many years now, using surplus fabrics — that would otherwise have ended up in the landfill — to offset carbon emissions and making sure clothes are made sustainably in the USA.

Monsoon Rita Wrap Collar Long Coat in Camel, $200

Fall Jackets: Monsoon Rita Wrap Collar Long Coat in Camel

This smart, classic coat is equal parts warm and impressive. Made from a wool-blend, it’s the type of coat you can wear on a blistering cold winter day and still show up to the office looking fabulous. Since its inception in 1973, Monsoon has pioneered ethical and sustainable practices. They’ve supported local artisans in India and are a founder member of the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI). Monsoon also founded a charitable trust in 1994 that helps disadvantaged women and children in Asia by providing them with healthcare, education, and income-generation projects. 

Everlane The ReNew Snap-Front Liner in Dark Spice, $98

Fall Jackets: Everlane The ReNew Snap-Front Liner in Dark Spice

Everlane is combatting our waste problem, one coat at a time. This coat is made from 100 percent recycled polyester, and makes recycling look really good. Other coats in the ReNew line are even made from renewed plastic bottles! We love this coat in this dark spice color, for a coat that keeps you warm and warms the soul. 


Jessica Suss is a native Chicagoan residing in Washington, D.C. She is currently getting her master’s degree in secondary English education at the University of Maryland. She enjoys petting other people’s dogs and is faithful to Lou Malnati’s alone. Jessica is also a supporter of MAZON and No Kid Hungry